The Nomad Blog

Notice of Non-Renewal of Lease: Laws in All 50 States | Nomad

May 22, 2023 8:33:35 AM / by The Nomad Team

r-architecture-pzMghCq2kS0-unsplash

Need to send a notice of non-renewal of lease to a tenant? It’s not always a comfortable conversation, but sometimes it needs to be done. Whether you’re doing renovations, planning to sell the property, or need to evict a tenant, a notice of non-renewal of lease provides the much-needed update and information tenants need before they move out.

Below, we’ll walk you through everything you need to know about notices of non-renewal of lease, including the local laws in all 50 states.

What Is a Notice of Non-Renewal of Lease?

A notice of non-renewal of lease is a legal-written document from the landlord to the tenant (or the tenant to the landlord) letting the other party know about an upcoming move-out date:

Landlord to Tenant: Landlords usually provide this to end a month-to-month or year-to-year tenancy, and it gives tenants adequate time to find a new home before they need to leave the property.

Tenant to Landlord: Tenants need to let landlords and property managers know if they intend to leave the property in the near future, giving landlords time to find new tenants and avoid expensive vacancies.

A landlord’s notice of non-renewal of lease typically includes the following:

  • Date: When the tenant needs to move out of the property.
  • Reason: The reason for the non-renewal.
  • Next Steps: The process for handling the transition, including check-out processes, deposits, and handing over the keys.

A tenant’s notice of non-renewal of lease typically includes the following:

  • Date: The date you plan to move out of the property.
  • Reason: Why you’re leaving. This is optional, but it might be helpful if there’s a problem with the property or neighborhood that your landlord should be aware of.
  • Forwarding Address: Where your landlord could reach you if there are additional questions or charges or if they need to send your security deposit

Keep in mind that the provisions around your notice to vacate need to stay in harmony with your tenant’s contract. 

First, you need to follow the state’s law and minimum requirements. However, if you add additional stipulations or timing that go beyond (while staying in accordance) with state law, you’ll need to respect those.

Required Notice of Non-Renewal of Lease by State

Below, we’ll provide the general guidelines around the notice of non-renewal of lease by state. However, these deadlines can fluctuate based on the reason for the non-renewal or eviction. 

For example, in some states, you can provide a 5-day notice if tenants fail to pay utility bills but you’ll need to provide a 30-day notice to end a month-to-month tenancy.

While state law doesn’t always specify how much notice a tenant needs to give a landlord, assume it’s the same as the landlord’s responsibility. If they must provide you with a 30-day notice, you should provide them with a 30-day notice.

Local regulations change periodically, so please consult with local legal counsel before taking action on any of this information.

Alabama

Landlords in Alabama can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice to vacate.

Alaska

Landlords in Alaska can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice to vacate.

Arizona

Landlords in Arizona can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day, 60-day, or 90-day written notice to vacate. Tenants must provide the same notice when planning to move out.

Arkansas

Landlords in Arkansas can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice to vacate.

California

Landlords in Arkansas can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice if the tenant has been renting for less than 1 year. However, if the tenant has been renting for 1 year or more, you’ll need to provide a 60-day notice.

Colorado

Landlords in Colorado can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 21-day written notice.

Connecticut

Landlords in Connecticut can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 3-day written notice.

Delaware

Landlords in Delaware can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 60-day written notice.

Florida

Landlords in Florida can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 15-day written notice. If the tenant pays quarterly, you must give them a 30-day notice—and if they have a yearly contract, you must give them a 60-day notice.

Georgia

Landlords in Delaware can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 60-day written notice. Tenants only need to provide 30 days’ notice when they plan to move out. 

Hawaii

Landlords in Hawaii can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 45-day written notice. 

Idaho

Landlords in Idaho can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Illinois

Landlords in Illinois can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. Landlords must provide 60-day notice if the tenant is between 6 months and 36 months, and they must provide 120 days' notice if the tenant has been there over 3 years.

Indiana

Landlords in Indiana can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. A year-to-year tenancy requires 3 months' notice.

Iowa

Landlords in Iowa can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Kansas

Landlords in Kansas can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Kentucky

Landlords in Kentucky can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Louisiana

Landlords in Lousinia can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause, but they must provide a notice 10 calendar days before the end of the month. 

Maine

Landlords in Maine can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Maryland

Landlords in Maine can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Massachusetts

Landlords in Massachusetts can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Michigan

Landlords in Michigan can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Minnesota

Landlords in Minnesota can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a written notice giving you the interval between the time rent is due or 3 months (whichever is less).

Mississippi

Landlords in Mississippi can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Missouri

Landlords in Missouri can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Montana

Landlords in Montana can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Nebraska

Landlords in Nebraska can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Nevada

Landlords in Nevada can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

New Hampshire

Landlords in New Hampshire can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

New Jersey

Landlords in New Jersey can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

New Mexico

Landlords in New Mexico can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

New York

Landlords in New York can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

North Carolina

Landlords in North Carolina can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 7-day written notice. 

North Dakota

Landlords in North Dakota can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Ohio

Landlords in Ohio can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Oklahoma

Landlords in Oklahoma can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Oregon

Landlords in Oregon can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania law doesn’t have a requirement for landlords or tenants to provide notice, but 30 days is the typical best practice.

Rhode Island

Landlords in Rhode Island can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

South Carolina

Landlords in South Carolina can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

South Dakota

Landlords in South Dakota can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Tennessee

Landlords in Tennessee can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Texas

Landlords in Texas can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Utah

Landlords in Utah can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 15-day written notice. 

Vermont

Landlords in Vermont can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Virginia

Landlords in Virginia can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Washington

Landlords in Washington can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 20-day written notice. 

West Virginia

Landlords in West Virginia can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Wisconsin

Landlords in Wisconsin can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 28-day written notice. 

Wyoming

Landlords in Wymong can end a month-to-month tenancy without legal cause with a 30-day written notice. 

Let Us Handle the Tenant Stuff for You

Tired of worrying about tenants and vacancies? Hand your problems over to Nomad. We’re your no-stress partner—we help you earn more and stress less with all the tools and expert services you need to manage your property.

Want to see how much rental income you could earn with Nomad? Just enter your property address now.

Tags: Rental Property

The Nomad Team

Written by The Nomad Team

Nomad exists to make renting better for property owners through guaranteed rent and a suite of tools owners can use to confidently manage their property.

Rent Your Property with Ease

nomad-illo-build-your-plan-buffaloes

Nomad gives you the tools to manage your property as well as guaranteed rental income.

  • Screening & Leasing Tools
  • $500K Property Protection
  • 24/7 Maintenance Concierge

Learn More